Vaccines Are Required But Not Everyone Agrees

photo%3A+iStock+%28Free+Images%29
Back to Article
Back to Article

Vaccines Are Required But Not Everyone Agrees

photo: iStock (Free Images)

photo: iStock (Free Images)

Getty Images/iStockphoto

photo: iStock (Free Images)

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Getty Images/iStockphoto

photo: iStock (Free Images)

Clarissa Iglesias, student-journalist

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Some people may believe that vaccines are not necessary. Facts may say otherwise.

All states have different laws for vaccines. California requires immunizations to enter public school according to Contra Costa Health Services.

Although one is not required to have vaccines, there is a law on vaccination in order to attend public school. According to nonprofit research site ProCon, “No US federal vaccination laws exist, but all 50 states have laws requiring children attending public school to be vaccinated against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, polio, measles, rubella and varicella.”

What vaccines do is expose the human body to antigens which allow its system to build immunity by mimicking the infection the medicine is for. This is how vaccines protect against diseases a person may encounter again in the future.

The World Health Organization reports that vaccines have prevented about 2 to 3 million deaths yearly. Additionally, 1.5 million deaths a year could have been avoided by being vaccinated.

But not everyone believes in the effectiveness of vaccines. An “anti-vaxxer” does not believe that vaccinations are necessary.

The Washington Post reports that as many as 3 in 10 Americans think that vaccines should not be mandatory.

Clairemont High School history teacher and parent Ms. Nolet believes that vaccines are important and agrees that they be mandatory.

“I believe vaccines should be mandatory unless you have a medical reason as to why you can’t take them; such as being allergic to the vaccine.”

There are different reasons as to why “anti-vaxxers” might refuse to be vaccinated or to vaccinate their children.

According to University of California pediatrician and professor Dr. Nina Shapiro, “The highest levels of children who have not been vaccinated usually find in the wealthiest communities in which it gives importance to keep a healthy lifestyle.”

There could be several factors as to why anti-vaxxers may be found more commonly in wealthy neighborhoods.

Dr. Shapiro said, “Some schools in more affluent areas of Southern California the number of unvaccinated students exceeds 50%.”

The influence of being an anti-vaxxer is most likely to come from research. Conclusions are made from online sources claiming there is harm done from vaccinations.

Clairemont High’s Registered Nurse Alexandra “Sasha” Lopez said, “There’s a lot of bad information that came out about 10 years ago; a doctor lied and made a study that one vaccine caused autism. Turns out, he made it all up but it exploded all over the internet. Even though we have proof that immunizations do not hurt people, it was impossible to retract the false information off the internet.”

Nurse Sascha says the false studies surfacing online impacted people’s point of view on vaccines. Although some may still believe in these claims, it has been proven that vaccines do not cause autism.

According to website WebMD, fears about a possible vaccine-autism link shifted from MMR to a substance used in some children’s vaccines. It is Thimerosal, and it contains mercury.

This may have caused the public to believe the substance, Thimerosal, caused autism since it was included in vaccines. This is proven to be false, but in 2001 the substance was removed to prevent more rumors.

Clairemont High School clinician and therapist Christian Schuhmann said, “Some beliefs may point to literature that talks about the fact that vaccinations aren’t as effective than they are made out to be, so it all depends on personal preference and one’s approach towards medicine.”

Although it depends on one’s standing on vaccination, opinions cannot beat facts. Vaccines may be safer to have rather than avoid.