Do SAT’s Describe Who You Are?

Hand+completing+a+multiple+choice+exam.
Hand completing a multiple choice exam.

Hand completing a multiple choice exam.

Bluestocking

Bluestocking

Hand completing a multiple choice exam.

Austin Haugland, Staff Writer

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At some point in a student’s life, the most important test on their mind is the SAT. The SAT stands for Scholastic Aptitude Test and is a test that examines the test taker’s use of logic and reasoning to determine their reading and math skills. Many students worry about their performance on the test because it can determine whether they can get into a college.

 

Because the SAT is a big concern for college applicants, it often causes stress and puts pressure on those taking it. Many are pressured into engaging in negative behaviors tin order to get the highest score possible. Students deprive themselves of sleep an worry excessively, some to the point of becoming nuerotic.

 

The most common myth about the SAT is that it determines one’s future since colleges factor students’ SAT scores into their admissions decisions. According to College Data, the SAT does play a role in college admission  as the test score can “scale the intelligence” of the user from a range of test takers. This makes it more simple and reliable for colleges to hand pick the best applicant who possesses greater knowledge or meets the criteria of their expectations.

 

The SAT has been taken by many CHS students. Senior Nick Davidson took the SAT and claims, “I don’t think colleges should focus so heavily on the SAT,” pointing out that the SAT is overrated in examining one’s intelligence. In fact many colleges have been relying less on the SAT to determine who gets admitted and who does not.

 

“My parents wanted me to get into a good school,” said Davidson. Davidson got into SDSU, his first cholce.  While Davidson did not get overly stressed, many other students do.

 

Advice for stressed SAT takers: don’t forget the rest of your application! By focusing more on the test the applicant may ignoring:  club memberships, athletics and volunteering as other parts of their application that can also help gain admission to their school of choice.


Depending on where a student is applying to college, the SAT shouldn’t be a cause of inordinate stress.  It should be a motivator for students to read and do homework, but within reason and not to the detriments of one’s health.

 

Students who take it more competitively are ones that are trying to get into very high ranking colleges. “If they’re going to a good college, they stress about an average score,” said head counselor Claudia Victorino.

According to Victorino, the SAT average score is 1100-1300 out of a scale of 1600.  However if you’re applying to a college without as much competition, there is no reason to succumb to  fear about it, as it is only one of the many factors that make the application.

 

The solution to this problem is to basically not worry too much about it. By not worrying about the problem you’re reducing stress. To reduce stress, it is recommended to not get distracted by the future from the test alone since you can always retake it, and if it gets really severe then seeking parental or counselor guidance will always be an option. If the SAT doesn’t fit one’s learning interests then there’s another test.

 

An alternative, the ACT is much like the SAT. However,  the ACT involves more logic and science reasoning, and at some universities is starting to replace the SAT as it is more updated than the other test.

 

Overall, students that take the SAT should NOT feel that they are being defined by a single test booklet. The SAT itself can measure one’s academic ability, but that doesn’t define their learning potential nor  who they are as a person. Colleges that require SAT scores, don’t always ask for just that, they ask for who they’re as an individual. As educated Americans, we should recognize the SAT as an academic measurement instead of the only indicator of future success.  

 

One test simple booklet should not control what we can make out of our futures.

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