Freshmen Fears

Photo+by+Diana+Arteaga%2C+junior
Photo by Diana Arteaga, junior

Photo by Diana Arteaga, junior

Photo by Diana Arteaga, junior

Diana Arteaga, junior

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What do all incoming freshman fear that teachers, counselors, and parents try to help with in high school?

Entering secondary school is known to be the transition that is most challenging to middle schoolers’ many former students know about the constant encounters of “freshman-phobias.”

Many people can recall hearing “Freshmen aren’t fresh meat,” especially as an upcoming teen having no idea what was going on. Teens would think that the most common fear is upperclassmen, yes it sort of is. Mainly it is about transitioning from middle school to high school and knowing how to prepare for the future.

A teen who is entering high school in the first months realize that they were worrying about nothing; upperclassmen do not care at all. They have their group of friends, participate in sports, and clubs and do not pay attention to the younger students.

For some of the 2021 class, it is noticeable that they have the ideology of having no fears. They are scared of getting lost, and of the atmosphere of high school.

In today’s society, high school is not like it is portrayed in movies, they are given more options for extra-curricular activities, attending school dances, pep rallies, and the ability to join clubs. “My expectation of high school was breaking out in a song,” ninth-grader Angela Barbontin said.

Health and Medical Science sophomore Madison Taylor message to the 9th graders, “Be yourself!”

Some juniors remember how it was and gave advice to first-year students that should be heard and followed.

“I thought the upperclassmen were going to be mean, but then I found out that no one cares,” said Health Academy junior Jonathan Aguirre.

“Never try to fit in, because it will not get you anywhere,” said Cristina Garza from the Academy of Health and Medical Science. “Being smart is cool, getting good grades is cool, failing your classes is not cool.”

This year’s seniors also shared their thoughts.

“Work hard, play hard,” said Rashaun Council.

“No one can make you do anything but yourself,” said Julietta Sanchez.

Parents also had wisdom to share. “Study more and focus on your materials. It’s not hard, just try your best. Most kids say it’s hard, but they have to find a way to overcome it. Nowadays kids have more free-time and have more opportunities; give yourself time,” said Rosalva Arteaga.

The schools also have counselors who help freshman academically, personally, and socially. “I know it’s a lot, but taking one thing at a time and then just knocking it out. I know people feel like it is kinda super stressful of life and not just of school, but you know at home as well, but you’ll get through it day by day. It is just not going to be a very quick fix you know so learning how to get through it is really my advice, that I know they will get through it because they have friends hopefully um staff that really want to help them so just really reaching out is the biggest thing I would encourage them to do,” said Clairemont counselor Christian Ramirez.

When it comes to high school, the expectations are different than the reality. There is no way to know and predict what the outcome will turn out to be, but a teen has to have in mind that it will be an unforgettable experience that must be lived to the fullest.

Health and Medical Sciences teacher Tania Peña said, “For freshman what I usually try to tell them is to just take one day at a time. It is only your freshman year you still have a lot to get used to and just not to worry because they’re all just going to adjust their transition. It´ll get better as long as they just take it you know one day at a time as far as school work is concerned. As far as fitting in I usually tell people. Most people are worried about what people are thinking of them, and so they’re not really thinking about what another person is doing or acting or what they look like. They’re too worried about what they’re thinking about themselves, and this goes for everybody.”

It is all about being yourself, having a big mindset, and asking those who have experienced everything an underclassman is encountering right now for advice.

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